Ivory the Goat, Part 1

Hello from snowy Minka Farm!
The snow was a beautiful white blanket, about 7″ deep. Arion, one of our horses, was warm in his blanket and seemed to enjoy the snow. But now we’re all ready for the melt!

This week’s story is about this little goat, Ivory. She is about 9 months old and has been in the barn with her same-aged sisters while the buck (a breeding male goat) was in the field with the older goat does. One morning in mid-December, we found her hopping around on three legs and it didn’t take much work to figure out that her leg was broken. How it happened is still a mystery.

Not ever having had one of our goats break a leg, I didn’t have all the proper equipment, wraps and bandaging in my supply closet. I called a friend of mine, Dr. John Bianco at Bahama Road Vet Hospital, and he set Ivory’s leg and splinted it for me. Ivory spent a couple of days by herself in a small stall but she was so lonely, I finally put her back with the other young goats, checking on her frequently. After a fairly short amount of time, everyone seemed to lose interest in the goat with the funny leg.

The next morning, we discovered that while the other goats had lost interest, the Great Pyrenees, Iris, who was also in the stall, had not. Iris knew that there was something on that goat’s leg that didn’t belong, so she took it off – all of the splinting material but none of the goat. Back to square one.

I replaced the splint (fortunately, I had ordered supplies just in case) and moved Ivory back to the small stall. I also gave her a companion, Bianca, who had been bottle raised and is very gentle, even to other goats. It took about a week, but Ivory finally began walking on the splinted leg. In fact, she eventually got to feeling so well, she started trying to climb the hay bales in her stall. That’s where I’ll end this story for now, but I’ll share the rest of Ivory’s story next time.

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